Beware of the Trains

Please use this forum for queries and answers about LNWR bridges, viaducts, track, water, buildings and so on.
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stephenweston
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Location: St David's, Pembrokeshire
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Beware of the Trains

Post by stephenweston » Thu Apr 11, 2019 3:31 pm

Hello all
I have a 'Beware of the Trains' Cast Iron sign with white letters on black.
With our move to St Davids, the salt air has got to it and it needs a bit of TLC.
What is the best way to restore it to it's former glory? A brisk rub down with a wire brush to start with? What type of paint might be best?
thanks in anticipation
Steve

Mike Williams
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Re: Beware of the Trains

Post by Mike Williams » Thu Apr 11, 2019 8:45 pm

Steve,

Many years ago I used Rustoleum primer and Dulux gloss, but I don't suppose they make that now. I now use Hammerite Smooth for anything particularly susceptible to rust. Only problem is you may have to use Hammerite black too as not many paints stick to it.

Many years ago a well known member (better not mention his name) from Bicester used to restore cast iron railway signs by dipping in a tank of caustic in his garden. He said this stripped just about everything except Hammerite which still seemed to stay in crevices "so don't use it". For me, that was a good reason TO use it and I have done so for 30 years.

Mike

David Bond
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Re: Beware of the Trains

Post by David Bond » Fri Apr 12, 2019 11:53 am

You can still buy solvent based Dulux Gloss in Black and White, and there is a grey primer which is also solvent based.

I found Rustoleum as per the link below, I am guessing that is what you have referred too Mike? How easy it would be to obtain off the shelf I do not know.

https://www.sprayster.com/product/rust- ... gKF_vD_BwE

Interesting question as I have acquired a wagon plate which will be in need of some attention within the next few years.

As an aisde, caustic is good stuff, and I have found that by first dipping a white metal carriage into a bath of it and taking off some of the strength, you can then use it to strip paint off a plastic wagon without it distorting the plastic.

David

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