LNWR Society Forum

Forum (only) for members of the LNWR Society
It is currently Thu Nov 23, 2017 12:42 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2016 12:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:30 pm
Posts: 37
I've received an enquiry via the website from an amateur football historian who is preparing an article (not for profit), on the Crawford railway accident, 1909.

A party of footballers were apparently travelling in L&NWR saloon no. 236 when the accident occurred, i.e. connecting rod failure on the Caledonian loco'. The football party was uninjured, although there were 10 injuries recorded to other passengers but no fatalities. The correspondent understands that saloon 236 was added to the 14:00 Euston to Glasgow express, the '2pm'(?) at Birmingham.

Firstly does this sound correct; would a saloon have been added to the '2pm' Glasgow express in this fashion at Birmingham? Secondly can anyone help with a diagram number for saloon 236? I assume the train would have largely comprised WCJS twelve-wheelers.

Any assistance gratefully received.

Ian


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2016 8:03 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 5:52 pm
Posts: 618
Location: Woking, Surrey
The Crawford accident occured on Friday 2nd April 1909.

As the 2.00pm Euston - Glasgow express travelled via the Trent Valley Line the saloon could not have been attached at Birmingham. However, the saloon might well have originated at Birmingham and been attached to "the Corridor" at Crewe having worked there on some other train.

Saloon 236 was a 42ft 0in x 8ft 0in Third Class Picnic Saloon of D.77, turned out new on 20/12/1899, and significantly was allocated to Birmingham. It seated 40 passengers, ample for a football team. It became 5236 on 20/02/12 under the 1910 renumbering scheme, and was repainted and renumbered into LMS livery as 10608 on 12/03/24. It was again renumbered 848 under the 1933 scheme (date unknown), and was withdrawn in the late 1930s.

But did English football teams play in Scotland in those days?

_________________
"A man would do nothing, if he waited until he could do it so well that no one at all would find fault with what he has done." - Cardinal Newman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 10:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:30 pm
Posts: 37
Thank you Philip.

I'll ask the question of the correspondent on why an English football team was travelling to Scotland. I don't know when the domestic football season finished in 1909, but maybe it was an end of season tour.

I'll return with the answer.

Best, Ian


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2016 11:48 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:30 pm
Posts: 37
To respond to Philip's question concerning why an English football team were travelling to Scotland by train, the following information has been provided by the correspondent:

'A party of players and officials from the Birmingham County Football Association had arranged to join the train probably at Crewe. The football party was to travel to Glasgow where the players were due to play a Scottish Junior Football Association team the next day in a Junior International match. No doubt using the £50 advance negotiated as part of the arrangements, the party had hired a special coach known as a “Picnic Saloon”.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group