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PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2014 10:04 pm 
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Does anybody know anything of the current whereabouts of any descendants of Bowen Cooke?


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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2014 4:09 pm 
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Location: Woking, Surrey
That sounds a tall order! Cooke died in 1920 so it is unlikely that even his grandchildren are still alive today. And Cooke is quite a common name (186th most common name in Great Britain, around 43,000 people ), while female descendants would have changed their name on marriage.

Have a look at Premier News No.62, where it is stated that at that time (November 1986) a daughter, Mrs Tracey, was still alive and gave her permssion for the Society to refurbish the gravestone. Mrs Tracey must have been pretty old by then!

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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2014 5:45 pm 
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My understanding is that his name was Charles John Bowen Cooke, in other words Bowen was a forename. His surname was Cooke, not Bowen-Cooke with a hyphen, although it is sometimes rendered as such (I think the originator of this was O.S.Nock)
There is a Bowen-Cooke Avenue in Wolverhampton, but the road in Crewe is named Bowen Cooke Avenue.
There is a portrait in the NRM claiming to be of C. J. Bowen-Cooke.

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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2014 9:54 pm 
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Location: Wellingborough
Victor Rashleigh (spelling) Bowen Cooke was a descendent of some sort and my father corresponded with him maybe 20 ears ago. He is dead now, but gave us some small items from CJ. I believe he also worked on the railway. No idea what family he had.

Sorry of that doesn't help a lot!

Mike


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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 12:53 pm 
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Location: Edinburgh
I guess your spelling is OK, Mike. C. J. Bowen Cooke's father was the Rev. Charles John Rashleigh Cooke.

Where O. S. Nock (if he was the original culprit) got the hyphen from, I don't know, but his use of it is erratic. His 1952 book Premier Line has the correct "Bowen Cooke" in most of the text, but it's given as "Bowen-Cooke" in the Introduction, in the Index and in two (of three) photo-captions. In his 1960, 1966 and 1968 books he seems to have settled for the hyphenated version, but somebody must have had a quiet word by 1977, when his LNWR Locomotives of C. J. Bowen Cooke appeared.

He must have seen Bowen Cooke's own book, so it can only be that Nock wrote far too quickly - and far too much.

Entertaining, but unreliable as a source.


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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 11:35 am 
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In my maternal family male children were given the maiden name of their mothers as a "last-but-one" name, and I understand that this was a common practice, certainly from Victorian times until WW1. Was "Bowen" the maiden surname of C.J. Bowen Cooke's mother?


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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 9:51 pm 
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Amongst the J M Dunn correspondence, which is part of the archive, but not yet at Kenilworth, is a letter from Dunn to V R Bowen Cooke of February 1953, who worked in the Road Motor Engineers Dept of the Railway Executive, Drummond St, London - in what capacity is not disclosed.
Dunn was seeking information on the medal awarded jointly to both C J Bowen Cooke and R A McLellan for their joint design of the 2-4-0, the drawing for which was exhibited at a 'London exhibition'. It transpires that Bowen Cooke kept the medal while McLellan kept the drawing.
V R Bowen Cooke's response was that he remembered a gold medallion on his father's watch chain, which at that time was in the possession of his sister, who lived in St Mawes (?) in Porstmouth. Unfortunately the sister's name is not given.
Journal Vol 7 No 7, Dec 2013 re-prints Dunn's article about the 'Rugby Express Locomotive', and which states no trace of the medal was found.
I hope some of the above may help in some small way.
Pete


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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 10:00 pm 
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....and just to add to my previous post - the 'Universal Directory of Railway Officials and Railway Year Book' for 1948-49 gives V R B Cooke as the Assistant Road Motor Engineer.
Pete


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 10:45 pm 
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Charles J B Cooke's mother's surname was indeed Bowen, her name was Frances Sarah Bowen born 24/2/1831 in Jordanston in Pembrokeshire. His wife was Annie Smith, she lived in Nuneaton when they met although I believe she was born in Chesterton, Staffordshire.

The daughter living in St Mawes, Cornwall was Faith Frances Cooke (Harris). Her husband was a local doctor. Frances travelled to the USA with her father during his tour sourcing materials for the Railway Executive in WW1. She acted as his secretary. Her father was staying in St Mawes when he died.

Charles and Annie had five children :-

Charles Bowen
Faith Frances
Erica L
Victor R
Eileen Mary Bowen (Eileen maried Christopher Birdwood Tracey in 1932) and they had a daughter Mary Faith Tracey who may be still alive?

Hope this answers a few questions!

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Martin O'Keeffe


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 11:44 am 
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My take on this disputed rendering of this CME's name is as told by a Crewe man,who as a boy remembered admiring Mr Cooke's daughters.I sure he would have said Mr Bowen Cooke's daughter's if that was in common usage.Please remember the formality of the early 1900's and the deference shown to those in authority.

However,if as a personal choice, Bowen was preferred to Charles or John;that puts things in a slightly different light.


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