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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2011 2:22 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 08, 2010 3:08 am
Posts: 15
In the continuing saga of modeling Castlethorpe I have now come to building the entry to the yard from the up and down slow lines at the north end.

There is a trailing turnout on the down slow line and a single slip on the adjacent up slow. So the yard is accessed by setting back from the Down across the Up via the diamond of the slip.

At the south end there is a trailing turnout on the Up line and no connection on the Down. The yard is accessed by setting back on the Up , similarly.

At the north end there is also a siding parallel to and adjacent to the Up slow. I assume this is a “refuge” siding as well as a back shunt for working the yard.

My question is , what was the curved slip road used for? (allowing access from the up to the down or vv).

In later years the LMS replaced the slip with a diamond and the road between yard and backshunt got 2 toe to toe turnouts allowing trains to leave the backshunt onto the Up slow directly rather than having to go through the yard and to the south end. The direct connection between Up and Down slow lines was lost.


John Brouwer


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 26, 2011 7:44 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2010 9:38 am
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John,

I may have misunderstood your text, but it appears to me that the slip to which you refer enabled trains to change from the Up Slow to Down Slow for possible engineering work, or vice versa. Another scenario would be to reverse a train from Roade on the Up Slow with the loco using the yard loop as a run round.

Brian Hayes.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 2:51 am 
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Thanks Brian,

A picture would have been worth some of my words! Your reply makes sense to me and will give the option of some interesting workings.

Castlethorpe gives the nice option of stopping or (I guess mostly) non stop fast workings while other goings on are going on on the slow lines and yard.

John Brouwer


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2011 3:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 18, 2010 9:17 pm
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For what it is worth, probably not very much, I have a vague recollection of seeing an article on Castlethorpe in a model magazine many years ago, with track diagram. Perhaps the Railway Modeller in the 1950s or 1960s. But perhaps not!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:37 pm 
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Your memory is very good Ted, There was indeed and article, by C. Gordon Watford, in the December 1956 Railway Modeller.
It shows what I take to be an LMS? BR? layout at the north end , not yet quite the toe to toe turnouts in the yard/siding which I think was the last one.

My own model is the first LNWR one, with single slip and turnout . It will be a test of track laying and wagon suspension backing in!

I received much good information from Dave Hanson Mike Williams and the Milton Keynes Library, way back in the early 1990's.

There is a good photo of the glazed part of the platform canopy, an interesting LNWR detail which was certainly not a necessity but did let more light into the building.

John Brouwer


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2011 12:48 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:19 pm
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As stated above, the crossover road could be used for P W trains to gain access to a site of work during an engineer's occupation (in wrong direction if necessary), or when one of the Slow lines was blocked by an obstruction or for planned engineering work , for Single Line Working (Rules 227 to 239). It could also be used when necessary for a train to run round, using the Up Slow and whichever of the sidings was clear of wagons.

The goods yard headhunt was not offically recognised as a Refuge Siding (Appendices 1911, 1916, 1931, 1937) but could be used to shunt an up train out of the way if necessary, as long as there were no vehicles standing on it. However the signalmen at Roade Junction would not take it into his calculations when deciding whether or not to run a slow goods train in front of a faster one.

Incidentally, the Down Slow starting signal was an LNWR concrete post at 379 yds from the box. This would probably date from the timber shortages of around 1915-20??? In 1944 there was a proposal to replace it with a LH cantilever structure of welded steel construction, at the greatly increased distance of 649 yds from the box, with the main stem on the up side of the Up Slow. At this distance a track circuit was necessary to prevent the signalman from overlooking a train standing at it. (plan 44-208 and sighting serial 6366). The object would be to allow longer trains to stand clear of the poinrts, without entering the block section. Does anyone know whether this proposal was carried out?

Cheers, Reg


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