LNWR Society Forum

Forum (only) for members of the LNWR Society
It is currently Thu Nov 23, 2017 12:52 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:30 pm
Posts: 37
Can anyone help with an enquiry received via the website please?

A question has been raised on whether the LNWR built or used any 'hydraulic power stations' where water supplies were used to provide power for winding capstans and lifts in busy goods stations? The questioner advises that he has identified that there were hydraulic power stations located near Fenchurch Street and at Burton-on-Trent, (admittedly not North Western).

Any information would be much appreciated.

Ian


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 12:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Feb 24, 2010 9:54 am
Posts: 37
Location: Dundalk, Ireland
Greenore station (Dundalk, Newry & Greenore Railway) used capstans to move wagons within the goods shed (between station and wharf) also the hotel lifts used hydraulic power
the accumulator tower is still standing

image link : http://eiretrains.com/Photo_Gallery/Rai ... _CC_JA.jpg

_________________
Regards
John martin


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 7:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2011 7:09 pm
Posts: 68
The power house and accumulator tower at Huddersfield are still to be seen, together with the wagon hoist. I believe that the accumulator itself, together with some of the jiggers in the warehouse are also still in place, but cannot be absolutely certain.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2017 8:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2011 7:09 pm
Posts: 68
There was certainly a hydraulic power house and system at the goods yard to the south east of Wolverhampton Station. I also seem to recall having read of another system at Curzon St Goods Birmingham. I would expect to find that such systems were provided at the majority of the larger goods warehouses etc throughout the LNWR. Some of the larger through passenger stations could well have had hydraulic lifts. Even Dewsbury Station had hydraulic lifts - but interestingly these were powered off the town water supply rather than a power house. This required very large diameter cylinders and rams - and very slow lifts!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 11:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 12:29 pm
Posts: 427
During my training time at Crewe works I spent one holiday with the millwrights. There was one maintenance task in the old works and that was work on the hydraulic accumulator for the station lifts: the memory says that was summer 1968. They were converted as were all of the hydraulic lifts in reasonably quick order: though I remember the lift in the Derby Nelson Street offices was still powered from a loco works accumulator at the time of the "Three day week". (With the loco works stopped the accumulator ran down fairly quickly without power.

Peter S.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 07, 2017 3:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:21 am
Posts: 24
Location: Millton Keynes
There was an accumulator at Heaton Norris Warehouse which as well as supplying hydraulic power to the warehouse also provided the power for the two lifts serving the platforms at Stockport Edgely station. As far as I know the accumulator tower can still be seen but does not now serve its original purpose. The lifts at Stockport were powered hydraulically until at least the 1960s.

Peter Spedding


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Apr 08, 2017 2:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 17, 2010 7:15 pm
Posts: 78
Location: God's own County
jim lodge wrote:
The power house and accumulator tower at Huddersfield are still to be seen, together with the wagon hoist. I believe that the accumulator itself, together with some of the jiggers in the warehouse are also still in place, but cannot be absolutely certain.


Many, many moons ago I was chatting with an old boy and the hydraulic capstans at Huddersfield came up in conversation. James related that they were powered directly from the reservoir at Standedge and the accumulator tower for use when water supplies were tight. The feeder main followed the track bed and gave some 300ft+ head of water at the station. I have never question the veracity of his information as he was always reliable with personal recollections of the North Western in the first decade.

The head gear for the hoist and the traverser are still in place in the warehouse.

_________________
How to start an argument on the internet:1, Express an opinion. 2, Wait


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Apr 09, 2017 8:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:30 pm
Posts: 37
A quick note to say thank you all for the information - much appreciated.

IAn


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 10:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:19 pm
Posts: 323
Most, if not all, large goods stations had capstans for moving wagons around. Would it be true to say that all LNWR capstan installations were powered by hydraulic pressure? Maybe some were converted to electric operation in the C20, but that cannot have been the case in the 1870s-80s. There must be references in the minutes of the Goods Traffic Committee, if anyone has some time to look.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 8:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2011 7:09 pm
Posts: 68
It wouldn't be true to say that all L&NWR goods yard capstan installations were hydraulically worked Reg. As a young apprentice fitter in the Leeds Outdoor Machinery Department in the late 1950s I helped with the removal of parts of the capstan system at Wellington Street L&NWR goods yard in Leeds.

The entire capstan system (c30 heads) was driven by underground lineshafting, and drive was transmitted to the individual capstans by bevel gears. The lineshafting was driven by a vertically mounted steam engine, and when the engine was started up, all the capstans rotated at once - there was no method of engaging/disengaging the capstans from the lineshafting. I also saw while passing the engine itself being removed and dismantled from an arch adjacent to one of the pairs of wagon hoists (which were also not hydraulically operated, but by belts driven by shafting from other steam engines) and clearly remember chargehand Bob Russell referring to it as a "jumbo engine". At that point in my life I did not have the experience to clearly recall what the said engine looked like, but have since wondered if it was possible that it was a set of loco cylinders and motion etc from a dismantled locomotive.

As the yard was inagurated in 1850 or thereabouts it could have been too early for hydraulic power to be used for the hoists which are depicted as being in place in a well known contemporary print, but I am unable to say with any conviction whether the capstans dated from the opening of the yard.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group