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 Post subject: Marton Station
PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 7:22 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 3:29 pm
Posts: 150
I have recently found a photograph of Marton station (Rugby to Leamington branch) which has a signal cabin located at the Leamington end of the down platform. Careful observation shows that the original cabin (and the only one I thought existed) is in place at the Rugby end of the down the platform. To my untrained and inexpert eye this unknown cabin doesn't even look LNWR in origin, dare I say it looks more Midland to me.

The photo was used to promote a talk by Roger Johnston on the history of Warwickshire Railways to the Marton History Group in March 2010. The caption to the photograph simply states Photo: Marton station in the 1920s

I have spoken to Roger who is a wonderful chap aged 87 but who had nothing to do with the flyer. It would seem no one knows who produced it. I am still digging away so hopefully I will get a better copy. Any information would be greatly appreciated and obviously fully credited.

Use the link to see the larger image found since this topic was posted http://www.warwickshirerailways.com/lms ... rt3975.htm

Many thanks

Mike


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Last edited by Prospero on Sat Aug 12, 2017 11:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Marton Station
PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 11:43 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 3:29 pm
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Since I posted this yesterday I have obtained a much larger and clearer image which is now on the website. I also posted the same request for information on the Signal Box Forum and received this response.

Dave (RDNA) wrote, 'It looks like an early Saxby and Farmer design to me, the photo my have been taken to record this box before it was replaced by the L&NWR design box at the far end of the platform. Hopefully a member with access to the records can provide more detail, I get the impression that the L&NWR was upgrading it's 'first generation' signalling in response to the Regulation of Railways Acts during the 1880s/90s. I'm sure the 1920 date that you quote is a red herring!'

Both the LNWR signal cabin (at the other end of the platform) and the Saxby & Farmer cabin are on the 1886 OS map albeit the latter not described as such. By 1904 only the LNWR signal cabin is evident remaining in place until the lifting of the goods yard. I am therefore now surmising that the Saxby & Farmer cabin relates to when the line was single, being demolished after the doubling of the line. If so perhaps this was the case because of its size, the extra levers etc requiring a larger frame than could be accommodated by the existing cabin? The 1884 OS map shows the LNWR cabin being twice the size of the Saxby & Farmers cabin.

More thoughts and information very welcome.

Mike


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 Post subject: Re: Marton Station
PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:11 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:19 pm
Posts: 323
Yes, it is indeed a Saxby & Farmer type 2a cabin, all-wood variety, as used extensively on the SD of the LNWR until the company started manufacturing their own equipment in 1873/74. Compare with photos of Bulkington, Brandon & Wolston, Banbury Lane (roof altered) and other more obscure places. My guess is that it was built about 1870-72 when interlocked signalling (and absolute block?) were introduced to the line. Maybe 1871 (Board of Trade file MT6/78/12). See "LNWR Signalling", also "The Signalbox - a Pictorial Record and Guide to Design".

I am at work at the mo, and don't have access to our database of SBs, or notes from the BoT files. The second box was a LNWR type 4, and if I recall it was built about 1884, probably when the line was doubled throughout, as indeed you suggest, Mike (cf Board of Trade files MT6/315/5 and MT6/370/1). I'll check when I get home. In which case the first (S&F) box had a life of little over 10 years!


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 Post subject: Re: Marton Station
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 11:52 am 
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Posts: 150
Reg

Many thanks for the information. Just in case you may have forgotten you wrote the following on the main Marton page referring to the photo of the LNWR Signal Cabin. Obviously any other information would be very welcome but I wouldn't want to waste your valuable time in duplicating material you have already supplied. See http://www.warwickshirerailways.com/lms ... rt3576.htm for the photo and below for your text.

the hours of opening of the signal cabins. Throughout the decade from May 1903 until February 1913, each issue to the Central District Working Time Table (WTT) shows Marton Station cabin as open from 9.30 to 10.10am six days a week. This was necessary to allow two Down passenger trains to follow each other closely. As Dunchurch and Birdingbury cabins were also switched out most of the time, the normal Absolute Block section was between Bilton Sidings (Rugby) and Marton Junction cabins, a distance of just under 9 miles. This was adequate for the infrequent passenger and goods service, and saved the cost of employing signalmen at these cabins. The local goods service was provided by a trip working from Rugby, arriving at Marton at 4/10 and leaving again at 4/25 back to Rugby, allowing just 15 minutes for shunting. This was part of trip 1 from Rugby, altered to trip 101 in 1913 for the Traffic Control scheme. Of course, the cabin would have to be opened to enable access to the sidings. Additionally, in summer 1908 and summer 1909 (July to September) the cabin was shown to be open daily from 2/25 to 3/0pm. This facilitated the passage of the seasonal GER & GWR Yarmouth to West Country train, which was booked to leave Rugby at 2/42 not long after the passage of a local service. On the face of it, before 1907 it seems the Stationmaster would have to open the cabin himself, as there was no-one else available. However, this might not have been the case, as suggested in the next paragraph. From 1907 it would have been the Porter-Signalman's job to open the cabin and switch in the block instruments for these and other purposes. Throughout this period Marton Junction cabin was shown to be open from 7.0 to 9/0 six days a week, or a period of 14 hours. The line was closed on Sundays. Before the Great War, signalmen's shifts on lines such as this were usually 12 hours long (although 10 hour shifts were worked on main lines, and 8 hours at the busiest stations). Prior to 1907, two signalmen were employed here, which would seem excessive to cover 14 hours of opening. However, maybe one man worked the Station cabin from 9.30am, and presumably also around 4pm for the goods, before walking to Marton Junction to relieve the early turn man there. This would give a shift of 12 hours including 30 minutes walking time. The two turns would rotate on a weekly basis, as was the norm. Although nominally employed at Marton Junction, they would have to be passed out to work both cabins. I stress that this is just a guess, and we will probably never know the truth for certain. After 1907, with the change to one signalman at Marton Junction and a Porter-Signalman, different arrangements must have been in force.

Again my sincere thanks for your help.

Regards

Mike


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 Post subject: Re: Marton Station
PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:07 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:19 pm
Posts: 323
Thanks Mike - I do indeed recall writing that!

I have been unable (so far) to establish the exact date of the doubling between Dunchurch and Marton. It may have been in 1871/72 when Dunchurch station was opened, or in 1875 when it was first shown as double in the annual returns to the Board of Trade. The answer may be in the LNWR minute books, or in the Board of Trade file for 1871 mentioned above. The S&F box illustrated probably dated from the doubling - but if the date turns out to be 1875, then that would seem rather late for a box of this type. A box built in 1875 would be expected to be a standard LNWR type 4. The arrangement of platforms and the trailing crossover indicates that the lines behind the camera were Up Main and Down Main, so that the points of double to single line must have been beyond the Leamington end of the Down platform; I have not seen a plan from this period. The S&F box must have been worked on the "Time Interval" system to Dunchurch, and "Staff only" to Leamington, as Absolute Block was not introduced until later.

The line between Marton and Leamington stations was doubled w.e.f. 28th January 1884 (various LNWR minutes, also Clinker), and the new type 4 box at Marton (at the Rugby end of the station) was reported as complete to the May meeting of the LNWR Loco Committee. Absolute Block working was introduced on the line in 1883/84 (BoT annual returns) - ie at the time of completion of the doubling, and construction of new SBs.


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 Post subject: Re: Marton Station
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 9:03 pm 
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Hi Mike

Great photo - you keep finding them!

Adding to Reg's notes:-

The PW Committee on 18.1.1872 reported that the widening between Marton and Dunchurch having been approved by the Government Inspector, the new line was opened for traffic on 1st January.

On 22.2.1872 the Traffic Committee approved the concentration of points at Marton - estimated cost £40 - no doubt the box in qurestion.

On 16.1.1884 the Traffic Committee approved a new Cabin and locking apparatus to be provided at Marton to deal with the whole of the station points and signals , the present groundframe which works the warehouse siding to be dispensed with - Estimated cost £367

I have the Marton cabin and signals (17 levers) reported into use at the Loco Committee on 9.6.1884.

Hope that helps

Regards
Mike


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 Post subject: Re: Marton Station
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 8:38 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:19 pm
Posts: 323
Thanks for adding the dates Mike H! - that saves me from having to trawl through the minutes :-)

I assume then that the doubling must be the subject of Board of Trade file MT6/78/12 - it will be interesting to read that sometime. I am pleased to see that the S&F type 2a cabin was constructed in 1871/72, which fits very well with all the previously known evidence. I will add the date to the database.

I think I must have assumed that the work reported at the meeting of 9.6.84 must have been carried out the previous month.

I reckon we have cracked this one now! Cheers, Reg


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