LNWR Society Forum

Forum (only) for members of the LNWR Society
It is currently Sat Sep 23, 2017 5:45 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2017 8:41 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 7:40 pm
Posts: 16
New Year greetings from a new member... I have a specific interest in Smethwick (Rolfe Street) station where I work in the booking office. My understanding is that the station building was built in the 1890s when LNWR did away with the level crossings in Smethwick. I am assuming that the building would be a 'standard' LNWR design, adapted to fit the location. Is this a correct assumption? Do any members have any information on how the station interior (booking hall, ticket office, goods lift etc) would have looked under LNWR ownership? Any help would be welcome...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 11:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2010 9:38 am
Posts: 66
My memory of Smethwick Rolfe Street is that the Booking Office was adjacent to the bridge. The Station Master I recollect had an office on the Up Platform, and I do not recall any lifts. Peter, you are taxing my memory for it is over 65 years since I worked at the station, initially as a relief booking clerk, and later as a relief station master. I will endeavour to do some further research, and if necessary correct my statement. There was a goods yard beyond the station on the Down Side looking towards Galton Bridge. There was a station at Soho which was at the terminus of the 31 tram route from Edmund Street. G&K had a major works in the area.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 1:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2010 9:49 am
Posts: 192
Location: Edinburgh
Hello Peter - welcome to the Forum. I'm sorry I can't tell you much about Smethwick station. All that C. R. Clinker says in his 'Railways of the West Midlands - a Chronology' (Stephenson Loco Society, 1954) is that it was originally opened on 1st July 1852, the two level crossings were abolished and replaced by an overbridge in July 1890, and the new station buildings were brought into use on 1st August 1890.

The only photographs I can think of which show the station were taken in 1957 and c1953 in 'D. J. Norton's Pictorial Survey of Railways in the West Midlands - Part One' by R. J. Essery (Wild Swan, 2008) on pages 88 and 90.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2017 10:19 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 7:40 pm
Posts: 16
Thank you to Brian and harry for their replies.

Network Rail Archives have unearthed the 1891 drawings from their microfilmed collection: http://nr.mediastorehouse.com/smethwick-rolfe-street-station/photo/162168.html

Hope they are of interest to members

Peter


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 2:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:19 pm
Posts: 315
Peter refers to 'standard' LNWR designs. While there were such things for platform buildings, where standard timber panels (6'6"?) were assembled to provide a structure of the size needed (from what date?), was there such a thing as a 'standard' brick building? Even for any specific area at any specific dates? Or was it that certain design features - doors, windows, chimneys, roofs, downspouts - would be used in what was otherwise a building planned by the architect for that location?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 10:24 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 7:40 pm
Posts: 16
My reference to a 'standard' LNWR station design was rather an assumption on my part that by the 1890s the LNWR would have had components of a brick building such as that at Smethwick which were assembled to fulfill the particular need of the site. Those who know Smethwick station will appreciate that it is basically a rectangular box on two levels, divided up to provide a large ticket hall and staff accommodation. Has any research been done into how the Railway designed and built stations in the 1890s?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2017 8:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 7:40 pm
Posts: 16
I am putting together an exhibition on Rolfe Street station to be placed in the newly-refurbished 'community' room off the Booking Hall. The room - refurbished by local students on a vocational course - will be opened from Monday 19th June to coincide with the unveiling of the new community mural on Platform 1.
I am hoping to get to the Society's Archives open day on Wednesday 7th June to see what I can find that would be useful. However, if members have memories or material which would add to the exhibition I would be very pleased to hear from them!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2017 7:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 7:40 pm
Posts: 16
Attachment:
Exhibition Room 2.jpg
Thanks to material from the Society archives (and the willing volunteers who patiently helped me there recently), the exhibition in the newly refurbished former waiting room off the Booking Hall is ready for its formal launch on Monday (19th June, 11am). Members are very welcome to come on the day or to visit the station during opening hours - 0700 to 1800 M-F, 0800-1700 Sat, closed Sunday -and ask for the key to the room.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 7:40 pm
Posts: 16
Today I gained entry into the room off the Booking Hall at Rolfe St which is marked on the 1890 plan as 'Ticket Inspection'. It turns out to be a lift shaft - from its size, presumably for a goods / parcels lift. Alas, no evidence of the make of the life nor of when it was installed / removed. Indeed, the only item of interest was a sign on an internal door to steps (presumably to the lift mechanism area) which was labelled 'Divisional Maintenance Engineer Plant & Machinery Section'.

Two photos attached for those who are interested in such signs and in late Victorian internal brickwork!


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 2:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 4:19 pm
Posts: 315
Very pleased to see the Archive was able to provide such good material for you - that's what it's there for!

I suspect the lift shaft may be a BR-era installation. I could check the minutes of the LNWR Traffic Committee for authorisation of it, but I suspect that would be an unrewarding exercise, if indeed it is post 1923. On the other hand, authorisations in the minutes might provide some useful extra data for your displays, so maybe I should check the indexes anyway. (Or I could email them to you and you could read them).

Keep up the good work! Cheers, Reg


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group